What is a Non-Profit?

What are some of the similarities and differences of non-profits and for profit organizations?

 

 

Sample Solution

What is a Non-Profit?

When joining a new organization, understanding its structure, needs and goals can be tremendously beneficial for short-and long-term success. Two of the major organizational structures, nonprofits and for-profits, have different missions, target audiences, and problem-solving strategies. A for-profit organization is a privately owned organization that serves its customers to earn a profit so that it can survive. A nonprofit organization is a nongovernmental organization that serves its customers but does not have profit as an organizational goal. There are other difference between the two. A for-profit can raise money from private investors, for which it must give equity or dividends to shareholders; ultimately, a return on investment is expected. A nonprofit, on the other hand, can seek donations from individuals, foundations and corporations. In for profit organization board members are paid, while in nonprofit board members are usually unpaid volunteers. Despite the differences between the two, they do have similarities. Both types of organizations must have effective governance, leadership, robust planning, quality services to constituents, competent and committed personnel, and cost-effective operations.

Contention Communities Boundaries Community boundaries can be made anyplace. A few contentions that we guarantee can be seen by looking at the networks we are utilizing to guarantee them. From the logical perspective, the conversation is talked about from the viewpoint of “crowd”, “network”, “field”, or “space” in which it happens (McKerrow, p. Converse with the crowd and the network to clarify the progressing banter. McIlro has four significant networks. It is close to home, social, specialized, and reasoning (Argument Communities # 31 – 39). McKerrow uncovered that everybody can invest energy in just one of the networks one after another (Argument Communities # 29). This implies individuals can move from the network to the network with a similar contention. The start of Kivel’s discussion occurred in a social network. Mr. Mckerrow says, “Social conversation … attempting to change another network of various worth or utilization of old worth, attempting to make another open” (McKerrow # 35) So as to clarify the conversation of the network, it is important to characterize the network itself. “The ordinary guideline of network is to control disputable conduct, social practice is to conclude who can discuss what authority, and they themselves” it is the particular principle that commands the conduct of conversation It is characterized fair and square. In the football match-up, these guidelines intend to make enthusiasts of the network. As a fan, in the event that we need to be a piece of the network, we comprehend that we have to adhere to the standards. A portion of these guidelines may incorporate great sportsmanship. For instance, we may not consent to calls from authorities, yet we realize that we should act here and there to turn into a piece of the network. So we can rehearse conversation by talking about on the telephone, however one thing we need to stop